About us

BACKGROUND

Criminal Law Week was established as a weekly, printed publication in 1997 by James Richardson Q.C.  From his own experience as a criminal barrister at 23 Essex Street, he realised how difficult it was to keep up-to-date and to find relevant information again in the future. Building on a strong print following, Criminal Law Week Online launched in 1998.

In 2006, Criminal Law Week’s Statutes Service was added to the online service, providing subscribers with fully up-to-date and annotated text of today's most relevant criminal legislation.

In 2008, Criminal Law Week won the prestigious BIALL (British and Irish Association of Law Librarians) Legal Journals Award, which aims to reward the publishing profession for quality products and outstanding contributions in the field of legal serial titles.

Sweet & Maxwell (part of Thomson Reuters) acquired Criminal Law Week in 2008 adding to its already well established and successful crime portfolio.

Today, as a highly-respected legal journal, Criminal Law Week is regularly cited in court at all levels, and is widely used by barristers and solicitors, the judiciary, the Crown Prosecution Service, the police, academic institutions and others within the criminal justice system. 

ABOUT THE CRIMINAL LAW WEEK TEAM

James Richardson Q.C., Editor
James was called to the Bar in 1975. He practised criminal law from the chambers of John Leonard Q.C. (subsequently Michael Worsley Q.C.) at 6 King’s Bench Walk for 15 years to 1990. He then continued in criminal practice at the chambers of Michael Hill Q.C. at 23 Essex Street until 1996 (where he remains as a door tenant). Apart from founding and editing Criminal Law Week, he has been the editor of the leading criminal practitioners’ work, Archbold:  Criminal Pleading, Evidence and Practice since 1982, having previously worked on that title as an assistant editor. From 1993 to 2006 he was a member of the editorial board of the Criminal Law Review. He was appointed Queen’s Counsel honoris causa in 2010 in recognition of his contribution to criminal law and practice through his editorship of Archbold and Criminal Law Week.

Deborah Colbran Espada, Senior Assistant Editor
Deborah qualified as a solicitor in 2004, after her training contract at the city law firm, Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer.  She joined Criminal Law Week as an assistant editor in July 2005, and has since been involved in various aspects of the business, including developing and launching the Statutes Service in 2006 and re-developing and launching the new website in 2011.

By selecting All CLW issues, you will search through every issue.

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Criminal Law Week uses the standard Boolean operators AND, OR, NEAR and NOT. These operators make it possible to search not only for items which contain a specific keyword or exact phrase, but also:

Exact phrases
A phrase consisting of a number of words in a specified order must be surrounded by double quotes, e.g. "bad character".

Small words
The site cannot search on words that are less than 3 characters, such as "to", "of" and "for". Should you wish to search for Abuse of Process, be sure to surround your search query with double quotes ("Abuse of Process").

AND
To search for items which contain a number of keywords/ phrases, separate search terms with a space, e.g. “false impression” implied assertion or with the word AND, e.g. “false impression” AND implied AND assertion.

OR
To search for items which contain at least one of a number of keywords/ phrases, separate search terms with the word OR, e.g. “bad character” OR “hearsay evidence” OR retrial.

NEAR
To search for items which contain keywords/ phrases within 50 words of each other, separate search terms with the word NEAR, e.g. “false impression” NEAR assertion.

NOT
To search for items which contain one keyword/ phrase but which do not contain another keyword/ phrase, separate search terms with the word NOT, e.g. to search for items which contain the phrase “bad character”, but do not contain the keyword defendant, type “bad character” NOT defendant.


Complex searches
The use of brackets with Boolean operators permits more complex searching.

Example 1: to search for items containing either:
    robbery AND “offensive weapon”
or:
    robbery AND firearm,
or all three search terms, type:
    robbery AND (“offensive weapon” OR firearm)

Example 2: to search for items which either contain both:
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or contain:
    entrapment
or which contain all three search terms, type:
    entrapment OR (“abuse of process” AND “agent
    provocateur”)


Non-searchable terms
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